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Category Archives: USDA

Dunlop vs. Talalay Latex

You may have heard OMI refer to our two lines of mattresses as “certified organic” or “100% natural.” What exactly do those terms mean, and what are the differences between the two? The difference is in the method of manufacturing the latex and the organic certification process: organic Dunlop vs. natural Talalay. Our Certified-Organic Mattresses are made using Dunlop latex only, whereas our 100%-Natural Mattresses are made using Talalay latex. The two processes both start with a botanical sap. However, the Dunlop we make our mattresses out of begins with a USDA-certified sap, whereas Talalay does not.

Extracting Rubber Sap: 

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The rubber sap that is used to manufacture both Dunlop and Talalay latex is harvested from sustainable plantations in Southeast Asia. The sap is extracted by cutting the bark of the rubber tree to allow the white sap to flow out. This method allows the tree to heal rapidly, and is the eco-friendly alternative to cutting down trees for latex extraction. Each tree can yield latex for up to 30 years, and is then harvested for furniture wood. The land is then replanted.

Dunlop:

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latex

The Dunlop manufacturing process was created in 1929, and was the first method developed for producing latex. The USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) certified-organic rubber sap is whipped into a froth (to aerate), and is then poured into a mold or onto a long conveyor belt. The latex is then slowly steam-baked into its solid state. Originally this process produced denser, less uniform latex, but over time the method has been refined to produce the even, consistent latex we use today. The finished core is then certified to GOLS (the Global Organic Latex Standard), allowing us to make 100% certified organic mattresses as the end result.

Talalay:

latex-process

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The Talalay family developed the Talalay manufacturing process during World War II. This method adds two additional steps to give the latex a more consistent cell structure: After the sap is whipped into a froth (to aerate) and poured into a mold, the mold is vacuum-sealed and the latex flash-frozen to keep particles from settling. The latex is then flash heated into its solid form.

The addition of these two steps (vacuum sealing and flash freezing) in the Talalay method is the main difference between Dunlop and Talalay, besides the organic certification and purity assurance. Many people still associate Dunlop latex with being a denser, less consistent product, but this is simply no longer true. Both methods have been refined over time to produce the uniform and supportive latex we use at OMI.

The OTA Annual Organic Report

The OTA is the leading voice of the organic trade industry in North America. They conduct surveys and reports on what is currently happening in the organic market. The OTA released their 2013 Organic Annual Report this year, and it is full of exciting information regarding the continued growth of, and interest in, the organic market. Here it is:

OTA Annual Report 2013

 

Check out our previous blogs about the organic market and the OTA, The Organic Market is Growing and OTA Reports 8 in 10 Parents Purchase Organic Products. For more news, articles and insight into the organics industry, visit the Organic Trade Association website HERE.

Is Food Healthy Just Because It’s Labeled Organic?

When most people see a food item that is labeled organic, they automatically assume that it is healthy for you. The truth is, food is labeled organic based on how it is grown, raised, or prepared, not based on the nutritional value. Unhealthy foods can be made with organic ingredients and be labeled as such, but will still be lacking in wholesome, nutritious ingredients. Check out this fun video that explains the difference between organic and healthy and will let you know what to look for next time you are shopping for a healthy meal:

Plan A Picnic

 

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Memorial Day Weekend is the perfect occasion to pack a picnic and head outdoors to enjoy the beautiful weather. First you have to decide what dishes to bring. Typical picnic foods can include hamburgers, hot dogs, potato salad, and cookies, which are not the healthiest choices (though they may be delicious). If you’re looking for better options, here are 10 healthy finger-food ideas for your next picnic outing!

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1. Edamame

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2. Ants on a Log (celery with peanut butter and raisins)

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3. Grilled Vegetables (zucchini, squash, mushrooms, etc.)

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4. Pita Chips with Hummus

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5. Homemade Trail Mix (dried fruits and nuts)

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6. Turkey Sandwiches with low-fat ingredients (whole-grain bread, lettuce, tomato, sprouts, and low-fat cheese)

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7. Shrimp and Lemon Skewers

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8. Yogurt

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9. Fruit Salad

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10. Angel Food Cake (low in calories) with fresh fruit and fat-free whipped cream

Now that your basket is packed with delicious foods, it’s time to head out and enjoy the beauty of nature!

 

A Look Inside the OMI Duo

Here is an informative video featuring Whitney, OMI’s National Sales Manager, discussing the key features of the OrganicPedic® Duo.

For more information on the Duo mattress, click HERE, or check out our previous blog about the benefits of the Duo Mattress, How Opposites Attract…the Duo.

The Science and Value of Organic

There are (literally) tons of benefits of choosing organic products. Check out this report from The Organic Center recently released by the USDA about the impact you can have by making an organic purchasing choice.   

The Organic Center Organic Report

For the full report click HERE.

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