Four Vitamins and Minerals for a Good Night’s Sleep

Our whole lives, we have been told by parents, doctors, teachers, the media, and even our government that it is very important to incorporate foods into our diets that are rich in vitamins and minerals. Vitamins and minerals support our bodies’ functions by increasing the efficiency of our bodies’ systems. Sleep is one of our most important functions because it allows us to rest, renew, and detoxify during the night. A good, deep rest also supports cell regeneration.


Some vitamins and minerals that support sleep are Vitamin D, magnesium, Vitamin B6, and potassium.


Vitamin D deficiency has been shown to cause daytime sleepiness. As our modern lives get busier, we are getting outside less than previous generations. Less time outside means we are getting less exposure to the sun, and therefore, not producing enough Vitamin D.


You can easily and naturally increase your Vitamin D by spending a bit more time outside, though it takes 2-3 months of regular sun exposure to build up the Vitamin D your body needs. Other options include adding fortified cereal or milk to your diet or taking a Vitamin D supplement.


Magnesium and Vitamin B6 are important minerals our bodies need for a good night’s rest. Both nutrients are imperative to the production of melatonin, a hormone produced by our bodies to help us feel sleepy. Magnesium deficiency can lead to insomnia. Foods rich in magnesium include dark leafy greens, beans and various nuts, seeds, and whole grains. Salmon, halibut, and tuna are good sources of Vitamin B6.


Potassium has been shown to help people stay asleep and have a deeper, more restful sleep. Though we think of bananas as a potassium-rich option, winter squash, sweet potatoes, potatoes, and yogurt provide more potassium per serving.

Making sure you are getting enough of these four vitamins and minerals will help you fall asleep faster and sleep better and longer.

Check out the following articles for more information on the benefits of adding these vitamins and minerals to your daily diet.

Don’t Lose Sleep During Sleep Awareness Week

Wake up!  Sleep Awareness Week is now underway and will wrap up with everyone losing an extra hour of sleep for Daylight Savings Time.  The National Sleep Foundation recently released the Sleep in America Poll® examining the sleep habits of caregivers and their children.


The primary objectives of the research included looking at parents’ perception of the importance of sleep, factors that impaired sleep and the impact of various types of electronic devices in parents’ and children’s bedrooms.  Not surprisingly, parents placed great value in the importance of sleep for their own health and wellbeing and for their children.  Over 90% felt a good night’s sleep helped with mood, health and performance. Of the parents that responded, 69% felt the importance of sleep was extremely important for their child’s performance at school.


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Factors that made sleep more difficult included juggling evening activities, homework, temperature, noise, light and pets.  Managing busy family afternoon and evening activities was the most common challenge.  The survey revealed that 41% of parents and 34% of children experienced getting a good night’s sleep due to evening activities.  Temperature was a factor in impaired sleep for 35% of parents. 

Electronic devices are commonplace throughout the home.  When used in the bedroom they have the potential to disrupt the quality and duration of sleep.  The light and noise from these devices can also lead to delayed bedtimes.  Televisions were the most common device found in bedrooms, with 62% of parents and 45% of children having televisions in their bedrooms.  Leaving electronic devices on at night can especially cause sleep to suffer, and the television was left on more often than any other device.

Are you aware of your sleeping habits?  Do you tend to have lots of activities in the evening?  Is your bedroom filled with electronic devices that might be robbing you of restful sleep?  Learning about your sleeping habits and rituals is the first step.  The National Sleep Foundation, which commissioned this study, is an independent nonprofit organization dedicated to ensuring that Americans are aware that their sleep is an important aspect of their overall health and safety. 

Ok, you can go to sleep now.