The 50 States Ranked By Sleep Deprivation

EARTH'S CITY LIGHTS 		Credit Data courtesy Marc Imhoff of NASA GSFC and Christopher Elvidge of NOAA NGDC. Image by Craig Mayhew and Robert Simmon, NASA GSFC. This image of Earth’s city lights was created with data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS). Originally designed to view clouds by moonlight, the OLS is also used to map the locations of permanent lights on the Earth’s surface. The brightest areas of the Earth are the most urbanized, but not necessarily the most populated. (Compare western Europe with China and India.) Cities tend to grow along coastlines and transportation networks. Even without the underlying map, the outlines of many continents would still be visible. The United States interstate highway system appears as a lattice connecting the brighter dots of city centers. In Russia, the Trans-Siberian railroad is a thin line stretching from Moscow through the center of Asia to Vladivostok. The Nile River, from the Aswan Dam to the Mediterranean Sea, is another bright thread through an otherwise dark region. Even more than 100 years after the invention of the electric light, some regions remain thinly populated and unlit. Antarctica is entirely dark. The interior jungles of Africa and South America are mostly dark, but lights are beginning to appear there. Deserts in Africa, Arabia, Australia, Mongolia, and the United States are poorly lit as well (except along the coast), along with the boreal forests of Canada and Russia, and the great mountains of the Himalaya. The Earth Observatory article Bright Lights, Big City describes how NASA scientists use city light data to map urbanization.

Although sleep is essential for our health many American adults still fail to get enough sleep each night. There are many different studies that show the detrimental effects that lack of sleep have on our physical and mental well-being as well as our productivity and functioning throughout the day. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) surveyed American adults to find how many hours they get each day, on average. While on a national level 35.1% of adults are sleep deprived, the problem varies significantly from state to state. The list was compiled by 24/7 Wall St. using the data from the CDC based on the percentage of adults by state reporting insufficient sleep (defined as less than seven hours per night).

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Here is the list of the states ranked from the smallest to the longest share of adults reporting insufficient sleep.

  1. South Dakota
  2. Colorado
  3. Minnesota
  4. Nebraska
  5. Idaho
  6. Montana
  7. Utah
  8. Kansas
  9. Iowa
  10. Vermont
  11. Wyoming
  12. Oregon
  13. North Dakota
  14. Washington
  15. New Mexico
  16. Wisconsin
  17. North Carolina
  18. New Hampshire
  19. Maine
  20. Texas
  21. Arizona
  22. California
  23. Missouri
  24. Illinois
  25. Massachusetts
  26. Alaska
  27. Connecticut
  28. Oklahoma
  29. Florida
  30. Virginia
  31. Nevada
  32. Louisiana
  33. Rhode Island
  34. Mississippi
  35. Tennessee
  36. New Jersey
  37. Arkansas
  38. Pennsylvania
  39. Delaware
  40. Ohio
  41. New York
  42. West Virginia
  43. Indiana
  44. South Carolina
  45. Georgia
  46. Michigan
  47. Alabama
  48. Maryland
  49. Kentucky
  50. Hawaii

Where does your state rank?

For the full list of states and their rankings as well as further information on the state’s statistics, see the full article HERE.

 

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