Are your pets affecting your sleep?

It is 10 pm and I am settling into bed trying to wind down from a hectic day. When I notice my cats are not on my bed, I call for them and they come in and settle in at my feet. Their reassuring purrs help me settle into a relaxed state before I fall blissfully asleep. This made me stop and think, do many pet owners allow their animals to sleep with them? If so, do they find it as reassuring and comforting as I do?

Sleeping dog and owner. Man and dog sleeping together

The Center of Sleep Medicine at the Mayo clinic looked into the impact of animals in the bedroom and how it can affect your sleep. They asked 150 people questions about their sleeping habits, and out of those 150, 49% of them had pets. Out of that 49%, half of them slept with their fur-friends. Some of the people who took part in this survey said that their pets “made them feel more safe and secure, and helped them get a better night’s rest”.

20% of the pet owners said that having their fur-friends in the bedroom with them was disruptive to their sleep, mostly due to snoring, wandering, or just being noisy when trying to settle. 41% believe it was beneficial or made no difference otherwise.

This side-study is providing interesting insight into how your fur-friends can affect your sleep. Since everyone is different and unique, the effects of sleeping with your pets may vary. There are many factors that can impact sleep, such as the number of pets you have and the size of your pet(s).

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A great way to ensure that your furry family member(s) can stay in your room without the possibility of disrupting your sleep is to give them their own organic bed. Our organic pet beds are filled with 100% certified organic cotton and organically-grown buckwheat hulls, sewn inside separate chambers. The separate-chamber design allows pets to customize the bed to their own special shape, and ensures years of comfort. The smaller round bed, great for cats or very small dogs, is constructed with an outer ring of 100% natural rubber.

Along with our pet beds, we make a removable washable cover made from heavy-duty colorgrown organic cotton canvas (colorgrown cotton naturally that grows in colors without bleaches or dyes).

PetBed

OMI Pet Beds are available in three sizes:

Small/Round: For pets under 20 lbs. – 20″ diameter – Wt. 7 lbs.

Medium: For pets up to 40 lbs. – 28″ x 32″ – Wt. 14 lbs.

Large: For pets up to 120 lbs. – 36″ x 48″ – Wt. 28 lbs.

Click HERE to find a retailer near you.

Strange Sleeping Habits of Historical Figures

Old Wooden Cabin Bedroom. Aged Cabin Bed.

Not everyone gets the recommended eight hours of sleep per night. Some of the world’s most famous figures had very interesting and unique sleeping habits.

Leonardo Da Vinci

Some sources claim that Da Vinci was able to stay awake and alert almost 22 hours of every day, all while working on his brilliant artworks and inventions. He slept only 1.5 – 2 hours a day, taking 20-minute naps every four hours. Today this sleep system is called the polyphasic sleep schedule, or the Uberman Sleep Cycle.

Nikola Tesla

Nikola Tesla never slept for more than 2 hours a day. Much like Da Vinci, Tesla followed the Uberman Sleep Cycle, and claimed to have never slept more than 2 hours a day. He once reportedly worked for 84 hours straight in a lab without any rest.

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson is also considered a polyphasic sleeper, only sleeping 2 hours a day. In letters written by Jefferson he discusses his sleep habits, referencing that his sleep was not very regular. He would sleep at different times (often late into the night), and he would devote time each night before bed to creative reading and would continue reading if the book was of particular interest. However, he would regularly wake up at sunrise every day.

Thomas Edison

Edison would continuously work in his lab with little to no sleep for days. He kept a cot in his lab to grab a few minutes as needed. A newspaper even captured a famous picture of Edison sleeping on his workbench. When not absorbed in a project, Edison was known to sleep for an entire day, waking only to take a light meal, and then would head back to bed.

Sir Isaac Newton

Newton only slept 3-4 hours daily, and he would work so long and hard that he would often go days without sleep. Eventually the lack of sleep led him to become ill from exhaustion.

Albert Einstein

It is believed that Einstein liked to sleep 10 hours a night – unless he was working very hard on an idea, when it would be 11. He claimed that his dreams helped him invent. Also, he believed that naps “refreshed the mind” and that they helped him to be more creative.

Benjamin Franklin

Franklin had a reputation for limiting his sleep. In his own autobiography he explains his quest for moral perfection, including allocating only 4 hours of sleep per night.

Charles Dickens

In order to improve his creativity, Charles Dickens slept facing north. Dickens, who reportedly suffered from insomnia, always kept a navigation compass with him to ensure that he wrote and slept facing north.

Lydon B. Johnson

The former president split his day into two parts to get more done. He usually woke up at about 6:30 or 7 a.m. and worked until 2 p.m. After a quick bout of exercise, Johnson would crawl back into bed for a 30-minute nap, getting up around 4 p.m. and working into the early morning.

Emily Bronte

19th century novelist, Emily Bronte, suffered from insomnia and would walk around in circles until she was tired enough to fall asleep.

Winston Churchill

Winston Churchill was known for taking a two-hour nap every day around 5:00 pm. He’d pour himself a weak whiskey and soda, and settle in for a nice nap. Churchill said this short nap allowed him to get 1 ½ days’ worth of work done every 24 hours.

Do you sleep like any of these famous figures or do you have your own unique sleep habits?

How to Choose the Right Pillow for You

I never thought about how a pillow can affect your quality of sleep and even your quality of life, but it really does make a huge difference in both respects. I grew up, as many of us do, sleeping on cotton or wool pillows. There are so many different types of pillows, and they are all meant for a variety of purposes. So how do you choose the right pillow for you?

Beautiful woman sleeping in white bed

Your pillow preference will depend on many factors, including your size, shape, and preferred sleeping position/s. A pillow that is good for a stomach sleeper may not have enough support for a side sleeper. Some pillows are better for people who suffer from allergies. Some can last much longer than others. OMI offers a variety of great pillows to meet your personalized needs. They are made with certified organic Eco-Wool™, certified organic cotton, 100%-natural rubber latex, and/or organic buckwheat hulls, in a variety of styles and comforts and covered in a luxuriously soft certified organic cotton cover.

So how do you know which pillow is right for you?

 

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OMI’s Certified Organic Cotton Pillow

For those of you seeking a firmer, flatter pillow, our cotton pillows are filled with pure, sanitized 100% certified organic cotton.

 

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OMI’s Certified Organic Eco-Wool™ Pillow

If you’d like a pillow that feels soft and springy, offers natural body-temperature regulation, and compacts less than cotton, then our Eco-Wool™ pillow is for you!

 

Latex pillows are my personal preference. I am a back and side sleeper, and I LOVE how latex instantly conforms to and supports my head and neck. OMI’s molded latex pillow has a comfortable medium support, and is perfect for when I am sleeping face-up. It supports my head and neck without pushing back too much on my head.

 

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OMI’s 100%-Natural Rubber Molded and Contour Pillows

The contour pillow is great for side sleepers. It contours to the curve of your neck and successfully keeps your head and neck aligned by filling in the space between your head and shoulders. It has a lower side and a higher side, so you have the choice of less or more support. Plus, dust mites hate latex, which makes them great for people with allergies, and OMI’s 100%-natural rubber latex pillows do not offgas harmful chemicals.

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OMI’s Wool-Wrapped 100%-Natural Shredded Rubber Pillow

OMI also offers 100%-natural shredded rubber latex pillows. Shredded latex pillows are great for sleepers who would like the benefits of a latex pillow, but are not sure what kind of loft would be best for their needs. The Wool-Wrapped 100%-Natural Shredded Rubber Pillow and the Crush™ 100%-natural shredded rubber pillow both offer customizable comfort.

 

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OMI’s Crush™ 100%-Natural Shredded Rubber Pillow

The certified organic cotton zippered cover allows the owner to add or remove the shredded latex to create a lighter or fuller comfort. The wool-wrapped shredded latex pillow has an outer chamber filled with our certified organic Eco-Wool™, which helps you to sleep cooler.

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OMI’s Wool-Wrapped Certified Organic Buckwheat-Hull Pillow

The wool-wrapped buckwheat pillow is another great option for sleepers who prefer to customize their pillow loft. In this dual-chambered pillow, the outside chamber is filled with organic Eco-Wool™, which cushions both the feel and the sound associated with buckwheat pillows. The inner chamber is filled with certified organic buckwheat hulls, which you can add or remove to customize your comfort.

No matter what your needs or preferences, OMI has the pure, organic pillow for you!

Click here for more information or to find the nearest OMI retailer.

Sleeping Habits of Some of History’s Greatest Minds

We have all heard of many geniuses staying up through the night working manically and creating masterpieces, writing prize-winning novels, and inventing amazing technologies. Or maybe you have heard the myth that you are most creative when you are tired. But are these bizarre sleeping habits really effective in creating brilliance?

In the book Daily Rituals: How Artists Work, by Mason Currey, Currey explores how brilliance has often been the product of a well-rested mind and not artistic all-nighters.

This New York Magazine infographic shows the typical sleeping habits of some of the world’s greatest minds

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Unfortunately, the infographic doesn’t give us any sleep-related tricks for releasing our own latent genius, other than following the traditional eight-hours-a-night rule.

So rest up and give your inner creative genius a chance to be brilliant!

 

Trouble Sleeping In A New Place? Blame It On Your Brain.

 

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Have you ever had trouble sleeping when you are in a new place? Do you toss and turn or easily wake when you travel or sleep somewhere other than your own bedroom? If so, you are not alone. According to a new study published in the journal “Current Biology,” it is a very normal occurrence for your first night’s sleep in new surroundings to be less than satisfactory.

Brain

Researchers at Brown University found that, similar to some animals, only half of the human brain “sleeps” the first night a person sleeps in a new environment. Research showed that the left hemisphere of the brain, the more logical and analytical side, was still actively “awake” throughout the night. The researchers believe that it is our brain’s way of “keeping watch” in unfamiliar territory. Though humans no longer worry about predators lurking in the darkness, our brains evolved during a time when that threat was very real.

So next time you are traveling or house sitting, plan accordingly, because your first night of sleep away from home will most likely not be as good as usual.

For more information, check out NPR’s article, “Half Your Brain Stands Guard When Sleeping In A New Place.”

 

 

A Good Night’s Sleep May Keep Colds Away

Woman Suffering From Cold Lying In Bed With Tissue

Now that cold season is upon us, it is important to figure out ways that we can help limit our chances of being struck by cold germs. An easy way to decrease your risk of catching a cold or other common infections is to ensure you are getting enough sleep.

Life Science reported the results of a national sleep survey in which researchers analyzed information from more than 22,000 Americans between 2005 and 2012.  The participants answered questions about their sleeping habits, as well as whether they’d had a cold, pneumonia, or an ear infection in the past month.

The participants who slept for 5 hours or less on average weeknights were 28 percent more likely to report having a cold in the past month and 82 percent more likely to report having the flu, pneumonia, or an ear infection compared with those who slept 7 to 8 hours on weeknights.

The study did not find a link between sleeping 9 hours or more and the risk of catching a cold or an infection.

So be sure to catch 7 to 8 hours of zzz’s a night to help increase your chances of fighting off the cold bug this spring.

If those in your home still happen to catch a cold or the flu this season, there are many helpful at-home remedies to help them get through it. Visit our previous blog, Natural Remedies to Fight the Flu and Seasonal Colds, for a great list of natural options!

5 Easy Tips for a Better Night’s Sleep

 

Do you lie in bed for hours, staring at the clock? Do you wake up feeling groggy and slow? Lack of sleep can do a lot more than make you have a bad morning—it can hurt your mental and physical health. This video will explore why getting that shut eye is so important, and it will teach you five easy ways to get all the refreshing sleep you need.