What’s in Your Mattress?

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With so many options available now in the way of mattresses, it’s hard to know what you are really paying for or sleeping on. Below is a breakdown of materials that are commonly used in mattresses in today’s market.

  1. Polyfoam/Quiltflex: Most commonly found as the “comfort” layer in the top of the mattress or as a the firm core in the mattress. Polyurethane foam is a synthetic foam that is found in everyday applications, from car seats to mattresses to furniture. Although polyfoam has come a long way and can now be found using a plant base, it is far from being organic or non-toxic.
  2. Memory Foam: Memory foam is polyurethane with the addition of chemicals that increase it’s viscosity and density. This is why it “sinks” when you lay on it and bounces back when you are no longer on it. Without these properties, it would just be foam.
  3. Springs: There are so many options out there in the way of spring mattresses. This is the most common type of mattress. From a continuous coil to pocket coil to zoned coils, you have your options. Each offers a different sleeping and support experience. A continuous coil is the least expensive of the coil systems out there, and can be found in most retailers’ showrooms by almost every mattress manufacturer. Pocket coils are individually wrapped and operate individually providing support to your whole body regardless of your body shape, type, or weight. They also cut down on motion, so if your partner moves, you don’t feel it as much as your would with a continuous coil. Zoned coils are found in a pocket coil option. Usually the lumbar area has a higher density coil to provide further support.
  4. Latex: Do your research, as there are many different latex options out there. There is blended latex, natural latex (contains synthetic materials), and certified organic rubber. Some mattresses contain more than one of the above. We at OMI manufacture our certified organic mattresses with certified organic Dunlop and certified organic high-density latex.
  5. Wool: Wool is usually used as a comfort layer in the top of the mattress. It helps regulate body temperature by whisking moisture away and keeping you and your sleeping area dry. When doing your research, be sure to ask how much wool is being used; is it all wool or a combination of wool and other fibers/materials? OMI uses certified organic wool for comfort and as a fire retardant (wool cannot be set on fire). Our mattresses contain wool on the sides, top, and bottom.
  6. Cotton: Most fabrics that cover mattresses are a form of cotton (referred to as “ticking”). Cotton can also be used as a comfort layer in a mattress. Cotton, like wool, helps to regulate body temperature and whisk moisture away, allowing you to sleep more comfortably. We use certified organic cotton in our mattresses, also.
  7. Polyester Fill: This is probably the most common raw material used as a comfort layer in mattresses. It is soft, fluffy, and inexpensive. Polyester fill is tiny synthetic fibers woven together to create the comfort layer.
  8. Fire Retardants: If you are worried about VOCs, then watch out for which fire retardants are being used in a mattress (or furniture for that matter). Toxic sprays are used to prevent mattresses from being set on fire and to pass the flame tests needed to be able to be sold in the U.S.

As a consumer, you need to do your homework and ask the hard questions about the exact makeup of your purchase. Ask where it was produced, ask to see certifications, and ask about every component.

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Contact your local OMI Retailer for a mattress you can trust in, made in an eco-friendly factory by employees who do not smoke or wear perfumes. We sanitize our certified organic wool and certified cotton before use. Handmade with nothing but the best certified organic materials.

Company is Coming!

With Thanksgiving a few days away and Christmas around the corner, are you prepared for all the company that is coming to stay? Don’t worry, we have you covered. Here are a few suggestions to make your guests comfortable, warm and happy while they visit.

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The Hide-A-Bed

Our GOLS certified, organic natural rubber latex mattress is the perfect addition to any pull-out-sofa. Absolutely comfortable and organic, Its 4” natural rubber core will provide the support you need to get a good nights sleep. Like our other mattresses, it is also covered with certified organic wool and certified organic cotton to help with temperature control and pressure points. A good full nights sleep means a great family day ahead.

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The Wooly Lite

Now that you have your guests’ mattress taken care of, it’s time to add a comfort layer. Our 1.5” Wooly Lite is a great addition to any mattress. It adds 1.5” of certified wool, quilted in certified organic cotton to your mattress. This great topper will add that little extra comfort to your pressure points, helping your guests to achieve the REM sleep everyone so badly needs.

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Thermal Blanket

This lightweight blanket is great for all seasons. 100% certified organic cotton in a crepe weave comes in all sizes, from crib to king. When a comforter is just too much or too heavy, this blanket makes the perfect substitute. Accompany this with a flat sheet, and guests are good to go for a long night’s rest.

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Wool Comforter

If you live in the northern states or Canada, this 100% certified organic wool comforter is the way to go. It will keep sleepers warm in the winter and cool in the summer due to all that wool being temperature regulating and moisture wicking. It’s a great way to top off any mattress.

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Wool-Wrapped 100%-Natural Shredded Rubber Latex Pillow

This is probably my favorite pillow out of all the pillows OMI offers. This wool-wrapped, 100% natural shredded rubber latex pillow has it all! The shredded latex gives you that down-like feel, and it’s adjustable!! If it’s too high, take some rubber out; if it’s too low, add some. You can adjust this pillow to suit what works best for you. The layer of wool helps with heat control and wicks moisture away, so it stays dry.

OMI is not responsible for guests refusing to leave because of the sleeping environment and hospitality you’ve given them. Have a safe and enjoyable holiday season ahead.

Ask for Page 2: Why GOLS and GOTS Should Offer Different Logos for Their Different Certifications

One of our retailers recently asked an important question: Are different certifications issued within the Global Organic Latex Standard (GOLS) and the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS)?

The answer is YES.GOTS and GOLSDID YOU KNOW… that the above seals, one from each of these USDA-approved third-party organic content certifiers, can have different meanings and levels of certification?

BE AWARE – Consumers need to be aware that GOLS and GOTS seals by themselves do not distinguish between FINISHED PRODUCT CERTIFICATIONS and INDIVIDUAL COMPONENT CERTIFICATION FOR A RAW MATERIAL (unless you read Page 2)!

DON’T BE FOOLED – One manufacturer of a complex textile, such as a mattress, may show either of the seals next to a finished product when only one of many components and sub-assemblies has actually been certified organic.

So what are the differences, and how can you distinguish between them?

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GOLS and GOTS offer two different organic certifications:

1. A finished-product organic certification, and

2. An organic certification for individual components of a product, which is usually issued to growers or yarn producers, not to the manufacturer.

KNOW WHAT QUESTIONS TO ASK – First, ask to see a copy of a certification, and make certain that it is in the manufacturer’s name and that the date is current. Usually you will find that certifications from growers merely show that a crop or component went through a third-party audit for organic certification, and that the grower’s certificates are NOT TRANSFERABLE.

Certificates must be in the name of the producer. Each retailer claiming the GOLS or GOTS seal must be audited in order to assure consumers that they have purchased the claimed organic component and that is has been used in their actual product.

MISLEADING – Placing the seal next to an image of a finished product such as a mattress gives the impression that the final or finished product has been audited and has met the stringent requirements of a total CERTIFIED ORGANIC PRODUCT.

For example, the GOLS certification offers two different label-grading designations:

  1. A manufacturer can label their finished product “Certified Organic” if the product contains 95% or more certified organic latex and other certified organic material. In addition, the manufacturer must submit to a third-party audit to prove their claims.
  1. A manufacturer can label a product “Made with X% of Organic.” They are claiming that if their product contains a minimum of 70% certified organic latex and they have submitted their product to an independent third-party audit to prove their claims, they are entitled to claim a “Made With” designation. (Without the audit, how can a consumer verify what they “claim”?)

gots-logo_rgbMany everyday consumers do not know to look for this labeling or to ask for Page 2, and they do not understand what it means. Unfortunately, GOLS and GOTS do not have different logos to distinguish between finished-product certification and other certifications.

GOLS and GOTS use the same logo for all of their certifications.

This creates confusion in the marketplace, with consumers thinking they are purchasing something that may not be what they think they are purchasing.

Here are a few examples of how this could confuse the average consumer:

1. If a MATTRESS is marketed as GOLS-certified it should hold the finished-product certification, rather than just component/process certifications in their company name.

2. For instance, a mattress that is composed of both certified organic latex and memory foam would not hold the finished-product certification, because the memory foam does not meet the standards for nontoxic materials.

3. A mattress composed of a 100% “natural” (as opposed to certified organic) latex core with a GOTS-certified organic cotton cover may hold a GOTS component certification in the manufacturer’s name for the fabric only, but it would be highly unlikely. The mattress as a whole would not be certified organic. Simply showing the fabric manufacturer’s GOTS certification on a website does not prove to consumers that they actually purchased the material or that it has been used in the product. Third-party audits mean everything!

All of these scenarios represent a time when each of these manufacturers could slap identical certification seals on their websites and the everyday consumer would have a hard time recognizing the differences between them.