The dangers of common dust in your home

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Thinking about skipping out on dusting while you clean your home? Did you know that even the smallest amount of dust can harbor harmful chemicals? According to a new study, researchers analyzed dust samples collected from homes in 14 different states. The results revealed 45 chemicals in dust that came from simple household products, such as vinyl flooring, furniture, cleaning products, perfumes, and even pizza boxes and popcorn bags.

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The 45 chemicals were found in five classes of compounds: Phthalates, flame retardants, phenols, fragrances, and highly fluorinated chemicals. Many of these chemicals have been linked to health hazards such as hormone disruption, fertility problems, and cancer. Click Here

Children are more likely to be at a higher risk for exposure to these chemicals from dust, because children often crawl or play on the floor and put their hands in their mouths. “These categories of chemicals are certainly of concern,” said Dr. Kenneth Spaeth, chief of Occupational and Environmental Medicine at Northwell Health in Great Neck, New York, who was not involved in the study. However, the new research shows only that the chemicals are present in dust. Future studies are now needed to examine the extent to which these chemicals get in to the body and contribute to harmful effects on health, Spaeth said.

In addition, this new study explains that dust exposes people to multiple chemicals at once, as opposed to just a single chemical at a time. For this reason, more research is needed to better understand the exact health effects of dust exposure, the researchers said.

This makes it very difficult for consumers to avoid these chemicals, because many are found in common household items. Manufacturers are often not required to include the substances on the label. However, there are ways for people to reduce their exposure to chemicals in dust. These methods include washing hands frequently, using a vacuum with a HEPA (high-efficiency particulate arrestance) filter, and opening windows to allow fresh air to circulate in the home, when possible.

Some companies have already banned some phthalates from children’s products, and the Food and Drug Administration is currently considering a petition to ban phthalates from food packaging, according to researchers.

To find out more about this study, visit the website HERE

Fall Into Cozy with OMI Pillow Tops

Made with certified organic Eco-Wool™ and/or 100%-organic natural rubber latex, our pillow tops offer a welcome layer of plushness. Wool is a wonderful natural choice for a sleep surface. Cool in the summer and warm in the winter, it wicks away moisture and dissipates it into the air over time. Certified organic natural rubber adds a supportive softness, cushioning pressure points while resisting body impressions. Covered in certified organic cotton sateen fabric, our pillow tops add a luxurious feel to any mattress.

The Wooly Lite (1½”)

woolyliteThe Eco-Wool™ Wooly Lite is perfectly suited for the sleeper who needs just a little extra surface cushioning.

Starting at $395

The Wooly (3”)

woolyhighThe Eco-Wool™ Wooly is well suited for sleepers who need a softer surface depth or who enjoy a bed with a “nesting” feel.

Starting at $595

The Wave (3”)

new_waveThe Wave pillow top is made of 3” of GOLS-certified organic natural rubber latex encased in certified organic cotton knit fabric. The Wave features a sculpted surface to provide comfort for sleepers with pressure-point issues. This comfortable and resilient natural-rubber pillow top provides added surface depth for sleepers, but with more firmness than a wool topper and without reducing the support of the mattress.

Starting at $795

The Allura (2”)

new_alluraOur 2” thick natural rubber topper offers surface softness. It is made with a single core of GOLS-certified organic natural rubber latex sap, and is covered with our signature OrganicPedic® knit quilting.

Starting $895

The Verona (2”)

new_veronaTwo inches of GOLS-certified organic natural rubber latex encased in certified organic natural rubber latex encased in certified organic cotton knit fabric. This super-soft layer adds that extra “Ahhh” to any OMI mattress.

Starting at $795

For more information on our pillow toppers and other OrganicPedic® products click HERE.

Ask for Page 2: Why GOLS and GOTS Should Offer Different Logos for Their Different Certifications

One of our retailers recently asked an important question: Are different certifications issued within the Global Organic Latex Standard (GOLS) and the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS)?

The answer is YES.GOTS and GOLSDID YOU KNOW… that the above seals, one from each of these USDA-approved third-party organic content certifiers, can have different meanings and levels of certification?

BE AWARE – Consumers need to be aware that GOLS and GOTS seals by themselves do not distinguish between FINISHED PRODUCT CERTIFICATIONS and INDIVIDUAL COMPONENT CERTIFICATION FOR A RAW MATERIAL (unless you read Page 2)!

DON’T BE FOOLED – One manufacturer of a complex textile, such as a mattress, may show either of the seals next to a finished product when only one of many components and sub-assemblies has actually been certified organic.

So what are the differences, and how can you distinguish between them?

GOLS Logo

GOLS and GOTS offer two different organic certifications:

1. A finished-product organic certification, and

2. An organic certification for individual components of a product, which is usually issued to growers or yarn producers, not to the manufacturer.

KNOW WHAT QUESTIONS TO ASK – First, ask to see a copy of a certification, and make certain that it is in the manufacturer’s name and that the date is current. Usually you will find that certifications from growers merely show that a crop or component went through a third-party audit for organic certification, and that the grower’s certificates are NOT TRANSFERABLE.

Certificates must be in the name of the producer. Each retailer claiming the GOLS or GOTS seal must be audited in order to assure consumers that they have purchased the claimed organic component and that is has been used in their actual product.

MISLEADING – Placing the seal next to an image of a finished product such as a mattress gives the impression that the final or finished product has been audited and has met the stringent requirements of a total CERTIFIED ORGANIC PRODUCT.

For example, the GOLS certification offers two different label-grading designations:

  1. A manufacturer can label their finished product “Certified Organic” if the product contains 95% or more certified organic latex and other certified organic material. In addition, the manufacturer must submit to a third-party audit to prove their claims.
  1. A manufacturer can label a product “Made with X% of Organic.” They are claiming that if their product contains a minimum of 70% certified organic latex and they have submitted their product to an independent third-party audit to prove their claims, they are entitled to claim a “Made With” designation. (Without the audit, how can a consumer verify what they “claim”?)

gots-logo_rgbMany everyday consumers do not know to look for this labeling or to ask for Page 2, and they do not understand what it means. Unfortunately, GOLS and GOTS do not have different logos to distinguish between finished-product certification and other certifications.

GOLS and GOTS use the same logo for all of their certifications.

This creates confusion in the marketplace, with consumers thinking they are purchasing something that may not be what they think they are purchasing.

Here are a few examples of how this could confuse the average consumer:

1. If a MATTRESS is marketed as GOLS-certified it should hold the finished-product certification, rather than just component/process certifications in their company name.

2. For instance, a mattress that is composed of both certified organic latex and memory foam would not hold the finished-product certification, because the memory foam does not meet the standards for nontoxic materials.

3. A mattress composed of a 100% “natural” (as opposed to certified organic) latex core with a GOTS-certified organic cotton cover may hold a GOTS component certification in the manufacturer’s name for the fabric only, but it would be highly unlikely. The mattress as a whole would not be certified organic. Simply showing the fabric manufacturer’s GOTS certification on a website does not prove to consumers that they actually purchased the material or that it has been used in the product. Third-party audits mean everything!

All of these scenarios represent a time when each of these manufacturers could slap identical certification seals on their websites and the everyday consumer would have a hard time recognizing the differences between them.

Click here >> for more information on the different GOLS and GOTS certifications, along with their labeling requirements.

Meet the Stratta by OrganicPedic Earth™!

Stratta

The OrganicPedic Earth™ Stratta is a medium-soft plush, 10” flat surface mattress made with 100% natural and GOLS-certified organic natural rubber latex. It starts with a 6” core of supportive medium latex under a flat-surface 3” extra-soft layer. The mattress is covered in our signature certified organic cotton and-wool quilting.

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Features and Benefits

  • Excellent back support while maintaining a plush feel
  • Pillow top built into the internal mattress design
  • Contours to the spine
  • Offers pressure-point relief
  • Motion-absorbing construction
  • Naturally mold-, mildew-, and dust-mite resistant

Specifications

  • Firmness: Medium-Soft Plush
  • Depth: Approximately 10”
  • Core: 100%-Natural & Certified Organic Rubber Latex
  • Cover: Certified Organic Wool & Certified Organic Cotton
  • Foundation: Wood Slat Padded with Sanitized Certified Organic Cotton
  • Sizes: Twin – King
  • Warranty: 20-Year Limited Warranty

*All dimensions are subject to a slight variance due to being custom made.

MSRP (mattress only): twin $3,999 • full $4,999 • queen $5,299 • king $6,799

Foundation sold separately.

For more information on the OrganicPedic™ Earth Collection or OrganicPedic™ products, click HERE.

Meet the OrganicPedic™ Terrene

Terrene

The OrganicPedic Earth™ Terrene is an ultra-plush, 12” sculpted-surface pillow-top mattress made with 100% natural and GOLS-certified organic natural rubber latex. It starts with a 3” core of medium, supportive latex.  The core is joined with two inches of soft latex on the top and bottom and covered in our signature certified organic cotton and wool quilting. A removable two-sided pillow top (3 1/2” deep)—also made of 100% natural rubber latex—is then placed on the mattress. The pillow top is made with two surface options: our exclusive sculpted surface on one side, and a flat surface on the other. This provides sleepers with maximum comfort and flexibility. The pillow top is fully covered with our signature certified organic cotton-and-wool quilting, and is attached to the mattress using our exclusive “button-down” process.

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Features and Benefits

  • Sculpted surface offers pressure-point relief and increases air circulation
  • Button-down pillow top can be used on either side
  • Motion-absorbing construction
  • Naturally mold-, mildew-, and dust-mite resistant

Specifications

  • Firmness: Ultra-Plush
  • Depth: Approximately 12”
  • Core: 100%-Natural & Certified Organic Rubber Latex
  • Cover: Certified Organic Wool & Certified Organic Cotton
  • Foundation: Wood Slat Padded with Sanitized Organic Cotton
  • Sizes: Twin – King
  • Warranty: 20-Year Limited Warranty
  • *All dimensions are subject to a slight variance due to being custom made.

MSRP (mattress only): twin $4,299 • full $5,799 • queen $6,799 • king $8,599

Foundation sold separately.

For more information on the OrganicPedic™ Earth Collection or OrganicPedic™ products, click HERE.

Are there federal requirements for calling a mattress “organic”?

Answer: Yes. And verifying these requirements is the only way to make sure you’re not falling victim to fraudulent advertising claims when shopping for an organic mattress.

The government agency that controls use of the word “organic” is the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), under Title XXI of the 1990 Farm Bill, otherwise known as The Organic Foods Production Act of 1990.

This Act established national standards governing the marketing of certain agricultural products as organically produced products in order to assure consumers that organically produced products meet a consistent standard and to facilitate fairness within interstate commerce.

USDA control over use of the word “organic” extends to non-edible agricultural crops such as cotton and rubber trees, and further extends to non-edible products derived from livestock, such as wool.

To call any of these raw materials “organic,” each producer must meet the requirements listed in the Act and subject its facility and products to annual audit by a USDA-approved “certifying agent.”

Furthermore, for a complex finished textile product, such as a mattress, to be called organic it must be composed of a minimum of 95% certified raw materials as listed above. Then independently, the company manufacturing the mattress must also meet the requirements as listed in the Act and to subject its facility and finished products to an independent annual textile audit to standards such as GOTS, by a USDA-approved certifying agent.

Therefore, to call a mattress “organic” or to sell it as such, the company producing the mattress must earn independent organic status and be awarded an organic certificate annually in their name. This means that a mattress cannot be called organic simply because it is made up of one, some, or even all organic raw materials. It is the “certifying agent” that substantiates that the organic claim being made is actually true. It must be a USDA-approved certifying agent, who through an audit process can give a company legitimate claim or right to use the term “organic.”

Legislation in the United States established the Federal Trade Commission Act in1914. Under this Act, the Commission is empowered to, among other things, prevent unfair methods of competition and unfair or deceptive consumer acts or representations affecting commerce.

If a company calls its product “organic” and its facility, methods, and specific products have not been awarded organic status by a USDA-approved certifying agent, that claim is deceptive, and constitutes an unfair method of competition in the marketplace. Unfair marketing claims fall under the purview of the FTC.

Specific to environmental claims, the FTC has published the “Green Guide.” While the guide defines a number of environmental terms and correct use and association of logos and seals, the primary emphasis of the document is substantiation. Environmental marketing claims must be substantiated.

Section 5 of the FTC Act prohibits deceptive acts and practices in or affecting commerce. A representation, omission, or practice is deceptive if it is likely to mislead consumers acting reasonably under the circumstances and is material to consumers’ decisions. See FTC Policy Statement on Deception, 103 FTC 174 (1983). To determine if an advertisement is deceptive, marketers must identify all express and implied claims that the advertisement reasonably conveys. Marketers must ensure that all reasonable interpretations of their claims are truthful, not misleading, and supported by a reasonable basis before they make the claims. See FTC Policy Statement Regarding Advertising Substantiation, 104 FTC 839 (1984).

In the context of environmental marketing claims, a reasonable basis often requires competent and reliable scientific evidence. Such evidence consists of tests, analyses, research, or studies that have been conducted and evaluated in an objective manner by qualified persons and are generally accepted in the profession to yield accurate and reliable results. Such evidence should be sufficient in quality and quantity based on standards generally accepted in the relevant scientific fields, when considered in light of the entire body of relevant and reliable scientific evidence, to substantiate that each of the marketing claims is true.

James Kohm is the Associate Director for the Enforcement Division of the Federal Trade Commission’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. In that capacity, he oversees enforcement of all consumer protection orders and the Commission’s Green Marketing program. When Mr. Kohm spoke on January 27, 2013 at the World Market Center, he made clear that the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) does not define what is or can be called organic. The FTC can conduct investigations relating to the organization, business, practices, and management of entities engaged in commerce and seek monetary redress and other relief for conduct injurious to consumers and other businesses from unsubstantiated environmental claims.

At OMI, we’ve worked hard to establish and maintain a comprehensive organic program. This ensures the creation and assurance of certified organic goods. Testing, quality assurance, lot tracking, purchasing organic raw materials (despite the higher cost), and spending thousands annually on auditing are just a few of the ways in which we keep our rigorous organic program in place. Third-party certification is the only thing protecting us from companies that do none of these things, but would try nevertheless to reap marketing dollars by fraudulently associating the term “organic” with their products.

It does not fall to the consumer or retailer to judge what is or is not organic. For a company to call its products “organic” it must have been granted organic status by a USDA-approved “certifying agent.” The consumer need only confirm a valid certificate with the company’s name and products listed, not a certification showing the name of a grower or producer. At OMI, we’ve covered all the bases, so you can “rest” assured you’re purchasing a TRULY organic mattress.

OMI Mattresses Now Provide Fire Retardant Information on New Label

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California Senate Bill 1019 was approved on September 30, 2014. This bill requires manufacturers of upholstered furniture to identify and label products that contain flame-retardant chemicals with a statement on the product’s label.

While mattresses were excluded from this legislation, OMI agrees that this is information consumers deserve to have. OMI has become the first mattress manufacturer to voluntarily label its mattresses with the words “This product contains Organic Wool and does not require flame retardant chemicals.” OrganicPedic® mattresses meet all flammability requirements using certified organic wool and unique methods of construction.

Consumers should have the right to choose the healthiest option available and have access to information regarding materials and processes used to manufacture a mattress. We feel a responsibility to help our customers become better educated about toxic chemicals found in conventional furniture and bedding.

We hope that this voluntary step on our part will not only support this important Senate bill, but also bring attention to the importance of labeling all products, and not just items found in the upholstered-furniture segment.

For more information on OMI’s wool flame barrier, check out our previous blog, “Who?.. What?.. Wool?”