Fall Into Cozy with OMI Pillow Tops

Made with certified organic Eco-Wool™ and/or 100%-organic natural rubber latex, our pillow tops offer a welcome layer of plushness. Wool is a wonderful natural choice for a sleep surface. Cool in the summer and warm in the winter, it wicks away moisture and dissipates it into the air over time. Certified organic natural rubber adds a supportive softness, cushioning pressure points while resisting body impressions. Covered in certified organic cotton sateen fabric, our pillow tops add a luxurious feel to any mattress.

The Wooly Lite (1½”)

woolyliteThe Eco-Wool™ Wooly Lite is perfectly suited for the sleeper who needs just a little extra surface cushioning.

Starting at $395

The Wooly (3”)

woolyhighThe Eco-Wool™ Wooly is well suited for sleepers who need a softer surface depth or who enjoy a bed with a “nesting” feel.

Starting at $595

The Wave (3”)

new_waveThe Wave pillow top is made of 3” of GOLS-certified organic natural rubber latex encased in certified organic cotton knit fabric. The Wave features a sculpted surface to provide comfort for sleepers with pressure-point issues. This comfortable and resilient natural-rubber pillow top provides added surface depth for sleepers, but with more firmness than a wool topper and without reducing the support of the mattress.

Starting at $795

The Allura (2”)

new_alluraOur 2” thick natural rubber topper offers surface softness. It is made with a single core of GOLS-certified organic natural rubber latex sap, and is covered with our signature OrganicPedic® knit quilting.

Starting $895

The Verona (2”)

new_veronaTwo inches of GOLS-certified organic natural rubber latex encased in certified organic natural rubber latex encased in certified organic cotton knit fabric. This super-soft layer adds that extra “Ahhh” to any OMI mattress.

Starting at $795

For more information on our pillow toppers and other OrganicPedic® products click HERE.

Dust and the Health Concerns It Brings

 

House dust

Dust is everywhere in your home, from under your bed to on your walls and, of course, on the floor. Did you know that not only is it a common allergy, but researchers have found that common household dust exposes people to harmful chemicals on a daily basis?

A team of researchers at Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University have found harmful chemicals in 90% of dust samples collected throughout the USA. As you read below, you’ll notice that flame retardants play a role in this study.

  • Ten harmful chemicals are found in ninety percent of the dust samples across multiple studies, including a known cancer-causing agent called TDCIPP. This flame retardant is frequently found in furniture, baby products and other household items.
  • Indoor dust consistently contains four classes of harmful chemicals in high amounts. Phthalates, substances that are used to make cosmetics, toys, vinyl flooring, and other products, were found in the highest concentration with a mean of 7,682 nanograms per gram of dust-an amount that was several orders of magnitude above the others. Phenols, chemicals used in cleaning products and other household items, were the number two highest chemical class followed by flame retardants and highly fluorinated chemicals used to make non-stick cookware.
  • Chemicals from dust are likely to get into young children’s bodies. A flame retardant added to couches, baby products, electronics and other products, TCEP, had the highest estimated intake followed by four phthalates–DEP, DEHP, BBzP and DnBP. The intake numbers in this study probably underestimate the true exposure to such chemicals, which are also found in products on the drug store shelf and even in fast food the authors say.
  • Phthalates such as DEP, DEHP, DNBP, and DIBP, are not only found at the highest concentrations in dust but are associated with many serious health hazards. Phthalates are thought to interfere with hormones in the body and are linked to a wide range of health issues including declines in IQ and respiratory problems in children.
  • Highly fluorinated chemicals such as PFOA and PFOS are also high on the potential harm scale. These types of chemicals, which are found in cell phones, pizza boxes, and many non-stick, waterproof and stain-resistant products have been linked to numerous health problems of the immune, digestive, developmental and endocrine systems.
  • Small amounts can add up. Many of the chemicals in dust are linked to the same health hazards, such as cancer or developmental and reproductive toxicity, and may be acting together. Exposure to even small amounts of chemicals in combination can lead to an amplified health risk, especially for developing infants or young children, the authors say.

For the full article, click HERE

When it comes to buying a new mattress, there are options out there to make sure you get a mattress without flame retardants. When purchasing a 100% certified OMI mattress, you get NO synthetic materials and NO flame retardants – truly certified mattresses made with only certified organic materials in a manufacturing facility that is also free from chemicals. Employees do not smoke, wear perfumes, or wash their clothes with fabric softeners. Chemical sensitivities are becoming more common, so having an option to sleep without chemicals can be a life saver. Contact your local retailer for more information on our mattresses or click HERE.

We also offer a great Wool Underpad for platform beds. This way when you flip your mattress, it is free from dust that has gathered under it.

Tips To Make Your Home More Eco-Friendly This Fall

house window overgrown with wild grapes with red autumn. Beautiful bright autumn leaves. Natuarlny autumn background.The days are getting shorter, leaves are beginning to fall and summer is officially over. Before settling in for the season, there are many ways we can look around our homes and ensure that everything is ready for the colder months ahead.

Here are some great eco-friendly tips for Fall:

  • Have your furnace inspected and cleaned.
  • Replace air filters
  • Clean your fireplace, to ensure maximum efficiency
  • Install a programmable thermostat
  • Ensure that all vents, baseboard heaters, and registers are free of obstructions so the air moves freely.
  • Open the blinds during the day to attract warmth. Close them at night to retain the warmth.
  • Reverse the direction of your ceiling fan. The fan should run clockwise so that is pushes the air up against the ceiling and down the walls to gently recirculate the warm air.
  • Check windows for air leaks and replace the caulking, if needed.
  • Ensure weather stripping around doors is in good condition and replace, as needed.
  • Don’t overfill your refrigerator as the cool air can circulate more easily with fewer obstacles.
  • Clean the ducts and area behind the dryer
  • Bring out your blankets, sweaters, and socks so you can snuggle up rather than raise your thermostat.
  • Add a blanket to your bedding to keep you warm during the cooler nights.
  • Clean your roof gutters and make sure downspouts are pointed away from the house.
  • Reduce your house temperature one degree at a time to help lower the energy used in heating your home.
  • Insulate your water heater and pipes. Turn the temperature on your water heater down to 120 degrees.
  • Shorten your shower times and install a low-flow showerhead to lessen water used and the energy to heat the water.

Now that your home is ready for the fall you can cuddle up, relax and enjoy the beauty of the season!

Perfect End-of-Summer Recipes

It is the last weekend of summer and time for one last BBQ before we put the grills back into storage. If summer has to end we might as well make good food to send it off right. Here are some great recipes to help make the perfect Summer’s end feast!

Watermelon “CAPRESE” with Balsamic Glaze

Photo Courtesy: www.skinnytaste.com
Photo Credit: http://www.skinnytaste.com

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/2 red seedless watermelon, sliced 1/2 inch thick (calculated with 16 oz)
  • 8 – 1 oz thin slices fresh mozzarella
  • 1 loose cup baby arugula
  • 2 tsp extra virgin olive oil
  • kosher salt
  • 2 tbsp balsamic glaze

DIRECTIONS

Use a 4-inch star-shaped cookie cutter (or any shape) and cut 16 stars out of the watermelon (about 1 oz each). Save the excess watermelon for another use.

Arrange the watermelon on a platter, then layer with cheese, arugula, 1/4 tsp olive oil and a pinch of salt on each. Top with a final star, drizzle each with balsamic glaze and serve.

For the full recipe click HERE.

Turkey Burgers with Orange Mustard Glaze

Photo Credit: www.foodnetwork.com
Photo Credit: http://www.foodnetwork.com

INGREDIENTS

Burgers:

  • 1 tbsp coarse kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp ground paprika
  • 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp granulated garlic
  • 3 lbs ground turkey (white and dark meat)

Glaze:

  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup diced yellow onion
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 cup diced jalapeno peppers, with seeds
  • 1 9 oz jar orange marmalade (with peel)
  • 1 tbsp dijon mustard
  • 1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/8 tsp chili powder

DIRECTIONS

Prep the burgers: Combine the salt, paprika, pepper and granulated garlic in a small bowl. Form 6 turkey patties and sprinkle on both sides with the seasoning mixture.

Make the glaze: Heat the vegetable oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion, garlic and jalapeños and saute until the onion is translucent, about 10 minutes. Add the marmalade, mustard, black pepper and chili powder and cook about 2 minutes, until fully combined. Reserve until ready to use.

Preheat a grill to high. Grill the patties until nice markings are shown, about 5 minutes per side, then reduce the flame to medium and cook until well done, 12 more minutes, flipping after 5 minutes. At the same time, toast the buns on the grill.

Serve the burgers on the buns; top with the glaze, lettuce, tomato and red onion. Serve with pickles.

For the full recipe click HERE.

Banana Split Kebobs

Photo Credit: www.delish.com
Photo Credit: http://www.delish.com

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 bananas, cut into 1″ pieces
  • 24 1″ pieces pineapple
  • 12 large strawberries, rinsed, dried, and halved
  • 2 cups chocolate chips
  • ½ cup peanuts, chopped

DIRECTIONS

Assemble the kebobs: thread two pieces of banana, pineapple, and strawberry onto skewer. Repeat process to assemble 23 more skewers. Place all on parchment-lined baking sheet.

In a microwave-safe bowl, heat chocolate in microwave using 30-second intervals and stirring in between until completely smooth.

Drizzle chocolate over fruit kebobs and top with chopped peanuts.

Freeze until ready to serve.

For the full recipe click HERE.

When you should harvest your vegetables from your garden

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There’s nothing better than growing your own vegetable garden. You spend a lot of time all summer taking care of your garden in order to get the most out of it. That’s why it’s important to know when it’s the right time to begin harvesting. This not only depends on when your crops are ripe, but also the length of your growing season.

Below is a list of garden vegetables ,along with the best time for picking each kind.

  • Asparagus: When spears are 6-8 inches tall and as thick as your pinky finger, snap them off at ground level and new ones will begin to grow. Stop harvesting about 4-6 weeks after the initial harvest.

  • Beans: Pick before the seeds start to bulge. They should snap in half easily.

  • Beets: These are ready as soon as you see the top of the beet above the soil line. You can leave them in the ground longer if you prefer larger-sized beets. Also, you can harvest the green tops and eat them as well.

  • Cabbage: When the head of the cabbage is solid all the way through when squeezed, it is fully matured and ready to pick.

  • Carrots: These are harder to judge, but can be picked when the carrot shows at the soil line and you can see the diameter of the carrot. They can be left in the ground longer once matured, and a light frost is said to sweeten the carrot.

  • Cauliflower: Similar to broccoli, when the head looks full and the curds of the head are smooth. They typically will not be the same size as ones found at the supermarket.

  • Corn: Once the silk turns dry and brown, the kernels should exude a milky substance when pricked.

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  • Cucumber: Check daily and harvest while they’re young. Timing and length will vary, but the cucumber should be firm and smooth. Over-ripe cucumbers can be bitter even before they start to turn yellow.

  • Eggplant: Slightly immature eggplants taste best. They should be firm and shiny. Cut the eggplant rather than pulling from the plant.

  • Garlic: Garlic tops will start to fall over and begin to turn brown when the bulbs are ready to be picked. Try to dig them up rather than pulling them, and allow them to dry before storing. It’s best to brush off the dirt instead of washing them.10584099_797756826923284_5225641105503497678_n

  • Kale: Kale should be deep green, with a firm texture. The flavor is best in cooler weather.

  • Lettuce (Head): Harvest once the head feels full and firm. Hot weather will cause them to go to seed quicker rather than filling out.

  • Lettuce (Leaf): Harvest the outer leaves once the plant reaches about 4 inches in height. Allow the younger leaves to grow, and repeat for most of the summer season.

  • Onions: Once the tops have ripened and fallen over you can dig up the onion, allow the onion to dry completely before storing.

  • Peas: These are best to be tasted to determine when to pick. If a sweeter pea is preferred, it is best to pick before the pea pods get too large and full.

  • Potatoes: “New” potatoes can be harvested when the tops start to flower. For full-sized potatoes, wait until the tops dry up and turn brown, then dig around the perimeter of the potato to avoid slicing it.

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  • Pumpkins: As soon as pumpkins have turned to the expected color and the vines are starting to wilt away, they can be picked. As soon as a pumpkin is cut from the vine it stops turning orange.

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  • Radishes: These mature rather quickly. As soon as you see radish pop out above the soil line is the best time to pick. Don’t leave them in the ground too long, as they will become tough and go to seed.

  • Squash (Winter): Similar to pumpkins, these can be cut from the vine as soon as they turn to the expected color.

  • Tomatoes: When a tomato has reached its color and is slightly soft to the touch, gently twist and pull from the vine.

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Now that all the hard work and harvesting are done, it’s time to enjoy the end results. There are many different ways to enjoy your harvest. Depending on how good a season it is, one way to enjoy your harvest in the winter months is to freeze certain vegetables or do some canning. Making spaghetti sauce or salsa is a great way to use up all those extra tomatoes and peppers. Happy Harvesting!

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The color of your sheets can be attracting bed bugs!

Beautiful contemporary bedroom

According to the Journal of Medical Entomology, bed bugs have a favorite color.   These creepy little bugs are attracted to darker colors, with over 28% being attracted to red and 24% preferring black. The preference for darker colors is due to the fact that the bugs can burrow and hide more easily in them as opposed to sunny locations. To help minimize the chance of bed bugs being attracted to your sheets, you should switch to ivory or white, as they are much brighter and therefore offer less appealing hiding places.

Another great way to prevent those bugs from getting into your mattress is to encase your mattress in an OMI organic cotton Mattress Barrier Cover. Our barrier covers are made from tightly-woven 100% certified organic cotton and close with a heavy-duty brass zipper. Unlike other synthetic versions, our soft, breathable organic cotton barrier offers a more healthful sleep. The barrier is available in different depths and sizes to meet your specific needs.

MattressBarrierCover

For the full study from the Journal of Medical Entomology click HERE.

Ask for Page 2: Why GOLS and GOTS Should Offer Different Logos for Their Different Certifications

One of our retailers recently asked an important question: Are different certifications issued within the Global Organic Latex Standard (GOLS) and the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS)?

The answer is YES.GOTS and GOLSDID YOU KNOW… that the above seals, one from each of these USDA-approved third-party organic content certifiers, can have different meanings and levels of certification?

BE AWARE – Consumers need to be aware that GOLS and GOTS seals by themselves do not distinguish between FINISHED PRODUCT CERTIFICATIONS and INDIVIDUAL COMPONENT CERTIFICATION FOR A RAW MATERIAL (unless you read Page 2)!

DON’T BE FOOLED – One manufacturer of a complex textile, such as a mattress, may show either of the seals next to a finished product when only one of many components and sub-assemblies has actually been certified organic.

So what are the differences, and how can you distinguish between them?

GOLS Logo

GOLS and GOTS offer two different organic certifications:

1. A finished-product organic certification, and

2. An organic certification for individual components of a product, which is usually issued to growers or yarn producers, not to the manufacturer.

KNOW WHAT QUESTIONS TO ASK – First, ask to see a copy of a certification, and make certain that it is in the manufacturer’s name and that the date is current. Usually you will find that certifications from growers merely show that a crop or component went through a third-party audit for organic certification, and that the grower’s certificates are NOT TRANSFERABLE.

Certificates must be in the name of the producer. Each retailer claiming the GOLS or GOTS seal must be audited in order to assure consumers that they have purchased the claimed organic component and that is has been used in their actual product.

MISLEADING – Placing the seal next to an image of a finished product such as a mattress gives the impression that the final or finished product has been audited and has met the stringent requirements of a total CERTIFIED ORGANIC PRODUCT.

For example, the GOLS certification offers two different label-grading designations:

  1. A manufacturer can label their finished product “Certified Organic” if the product contains 95% or more certified organic latex and other certified organic material. In addition, the manufacturer must submit to a third-party audit to prove their claims.
  1. A manufacturer can label a product “Made with X% of Organic.” They are claiming that if their product contains a minimum of 70% certified organic latex and they have submitted their product to an independent third-party audit to prove their claims, they are entitled to claim a “Made With” designation. (Without the audit, how can a consumer verify what they “claim”?)

gots-logo_rgbMany everyday consumers do not know to look for this labeling or to ask for Page 2, and they do not understand what it means. Unfortunately, GOLS and GOTS do not have different logos to distinguish between finished-product certification and other certifications.

GOLS and GOTS use the same logo for all of their certifications.

This creates confusion in the marketplace, with consumers thinking they are purchasing something that may not be what they think they are purchasing.

Here are a few examples of how this could confuse the average consumer:

1. If a MATTRESS is marketed as GOLS-certified it should hold the finished-product certification, rather than just component/process certifications in their company name.

2. For instance, a mattress that is composed of both certified organic latex and memory foam would not hold the finished-product certification, because the memory foam does not meet the standards for nontoxic materials.

3. A mattress composed of a 100% “natural” (as opposed to certified organic) latex core with a GOTS-certified organic cotton cover may hold a GOTS component certification in the manufacturer’s name for the fabric only, but it would be highly unlikely. The mattress as a whole would not be certified organic. Simply showing the fabric manufacturer’s GOTS certification on a website does not prove to consumers that they actually purchased the material or that it has been used in the product. Third-party audits mean everything!

All of these scenarios represent a time when each of these manufacturers could slap identical certification seals on their websites and the everyday consumer would have a hard time recognizing the differences between them.

Click here >> for more information on the different GOLS and GOTS certifications, along with their labeling requirements.